Friday, May 19, 2017

Zika virus mutation and the challenges

Zika Virus - Mutation and the challenges.

I have thought matrixed the idea behind the zika viri research and i come to a disturbing conclusion about the problematic relationship between the zika virus and a comparable example the common flue .. and swine flue...

Both forms can prove deadly and problematic for chemical treatments ...

You see the flue mutates between hosts and within a single host quite regularly...
"So what is the problem zika is not the same !"  the problem is that zika like the flue or the cold is an example of cross species parasitical entities ...

Therefore changes between host and delivery host (the mosquito); Both have changing DNA though breeding cycles and consequentially the zika virus must mutate rapidly to out perform host adaptation..

Chemicals that bind now most probably will not perform their job's at a later mutation cycle and may vary in performance over the mutation bias...

The very nature of rapidly developing mutation both changes and challenges the non adaptive chemical treatment bias of research and scientific study !

One sample of the genetic code may not always prove valid for all variants and most problematically not prove effective, This variance is after all  what provides for survivors of diseases like the plague and the forming of man from the suggested primate ancestry.

So what could we do about this ? have the bind points proved to be unchanging or mutating .. are their variances in these bind points ?

What are the inevitable problems we will face in science and medicine of these crucial issues.

Rupert S


zika virus further research

zika virus

most relevant - Analysis of Dengue Virus Genetic Diversity during Human and Mosquito Infection Reveals Genetic Constraints

mutation rates amongst RNA Viri

viral mutation rates and math

The prediction of virus mutation using neural networks and rough set techniques - the analysis engine

Predicting virus mutations through statistical relational learning

Replication and Adaptive Mutations of Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses in Tracheal Organ Cultures of Different Avian Species


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